Do You Want To Quit Smoking? This Is What Happens To Your Body When You Stop!

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Cigarettes are among the most addicting drugs that we can consume, which explains why around 18% of Americans smoke. When people do opt to quit, only 4-7% are successful at quitting with any given attempt. It’s difficult to be confident in your ability to quit if you’ve tried and failed in the past. Still, if you want to quit, then quit. The benefits of quitting are nearly immediate and long-lasting. This is what happens inside your body when you put out your last cigarette.

30 minutes after your last cigarette, your blood pressure and pulse drop. Smokers often experience cold hands and feet due to poor circulation. All it takes is a half an hour after your last cigarette and your hands and feet will begin to warm up.

8 hours after your last cigarette, carbon monoxide levels in your blood drops. Oxygen levels increase.

2 days after your last cigarette, your sense of smell and taste improve some. It differs from person to person.

72 hours after your last cigarette, your bronchial tubes relax making breathing a bit easier.

Between 2 weeks and 3 months after your last cigarette, circulation and lung function improve. You’ll experience greater stamina during daily activities and workouts.

Between 1 and 9 months after your last cigarette, congestion and coughing decreases. Your lungs clear mucus more effectively, reducing the frequency of illness and infection. Your energy levels improve.

A year after your last cigarette, your chance of getting heart disease drops to half that of an active smoker.

5 years after your last cigarette, your risk of stroke is the same as a non-smoker. Your risk of mouth, throat, and esophageal cancer are halved. The risk of cervical cancer falls to that of a non-smoker.

10 years after your last cigarette, your chance of getting lung cancer is half that of a smoker. Your risk of pancreatic is approximately the same as that of a non-smoker.

15 years after your last cigarette, your risk of heart disease is about the same as a non-smoker. Additionally, your overall risk of death is approximately the same as a non-smoker.

This post was republished from simpleorganiclife.org. You can find the original post here.